Slaying the Sugar Dragon

SugarDragon

I finished my last Whole30 in May and it was a really great 30 days of strictly clean eating – with the exception of having a small sliver of cake at my grandfather’s 99th birthday party.  I fully acknowledged I would possibly being doing that prior to starting my 30 days in May and I fully made amends with it.  I have done the Whole 30 program so many times over the last two years and I decided that if I wanted to have a piece of cake with my grandfather to celebrate his 99th birthday, I darn well would!  And without the guilt (although I did feel some) and without restarting the program.  Like I said, I’ve committed to 30 days many times in the past and this one indulgence was an exception to the rule.

THEWHOLE30

This book changes everything!

But, since I finished those 30 days and since the start of summer, I feel like I have been overindulging way too much.  I feel sluggish and fat and bloated and kinda disgusting.  So, I decided last week that I would start a new Whole 30 this coming week.

At first I was okay with it.  Then I was feeling a little panicky because I’ve been enjoying my treats this summer.  And that right there is the problem!  Too many treats!  the sugar dragons are slaying me and I need to change that around.  So, now I’m back on board and fully excited about starting fresh on Monday.  I literally cannot wait.

So why wait?  I’m sure you’re asking.  Because I need to get ready.  To be honest, I (personally) don’t find the Whole 30 program that hard.  There have been a few times in the past that I struggled a bit with cravings, but most of the times I’ve done the program, I have been A-OK.  And I’m pretty stubborn, so when I commit myself to doing something like this, I fully commit to it.  That being said, it’s not something I want to jump into.  I need a couple of days to plan it out.  I need to think about food choices and meals and preparation and “it’s still summer and where am I gonna be next week?” types of things.

But I’m ready.  And I am motivated and committed and I can’t wait.  And each time I look in the mirror and I see that weird little belly bloat, it gives me the kick-in-the-butt-motivation I need to ensure I go through with it.

Sugar Dragon

That’s me slaying the beast…I’m the one in pink.

If you haven’t tried this program, I encourage you to do so.  It’s only for 30 days and it can help you rid your body of bloat and inflammation and possibly even excess weight.  The benefit of ridding yourself of sugar cravings and having food freedom – even for only 30 days – can make it all worthwhile.  And you don’t have to skimp on meals or count calories. You get to eat delicious, fresh and whole foods.  And you can experiment with different foods or food combination.  I have never felt less than satisfied when doing a Whole 30.  And Pinterest is a great place to find recipes, guidance (although I fully recommend that you read the book The Whole 30, it might change your life), meal ideas, etc.  Here’s a link for some great lunch ideas.

If you’re not ready to try 30 days of clean eating, maybe ask yourself why.  What would you be afraid of?  That chocolate cake or ice cream sundae will still be there in a month’s time. Going without processed mayo (Whole 30 has several recipes for mayo) is not going to end you.  Check out the book and the website and consider giving it a try.  And if you have any questions, comment below or shoot me an email

~Cheers.

 

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Why I’m Waiting to do the Whole 30

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If you have been reading this blog for a while you will note that I love the Whole 30 program.  Seriously, I am absolutely in love with it.   (If you’re not familiar with the program, go check out the website: Whole30.)

I love the food I get to eat and the way I feel when I’m doing it.  And I love how proud I am when I’ve finished it.  In fact, I love it so much that I’ve been super excited to get started on a Whole 30 in early 2017.

I’ve noticed that there are currently tons and tons of challengers out there – all who started their programs on January 1st.  And I applaud them.

Me, however, I have opted to wait a week.  Because I’ve done the program so many times over the last year and a half, I know that if I had started on New Year’s Day I would have been setting myself up for failure.  With so much “junk” in my system throughout the month of December (wine, chocolate, cookies, wine, wine, wine), I knew that I would need to ease my way out of Christmas goodness for a good week before jumping into my 30 days.  Which, by the way, I am hoping to turn into a Whole 60. *fingers crossed*

I didn’t eat terribly the entire month, but I did have way more sugar than I normally would.  I mean, everywhere I looked there was chocolate.  And I had more wine date (with and without others!) then necessary.  In fact, I have had more wine in the last month than I have had in the last 3 months.  (And that’s still not saying a lot.)

This week I have been omitting most of the holiday garbage…limiting the chocolate, omitting the other sweets, cutting out down the wine.  And by the weekend, I will have all of it out of my system.

I am really stoked to get going on this though.  And, to top it off, my boyfriend bought me the Whole 30 Cookbook for Christmas and intends on trying the program with me this time.

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Another fitness wish come true.  🙂

I really encourage anyone who is planning to do the Whole 30 to read the book.  Spend the money and read it.  It’s worth it.  It may change your life!  I have truly benefited from this program and I think everyone can go clean for 30 days – even just once.

The basis of the program is to eliminate food cravings, sugar dependency, and systemic inflammation.  “Think of it as a short-term nutritional reset, designed to help you put an end to unhealthy cravings and habits, restore a healthy metabolism, heal your digestive tract, and balance your immune system.”

This is not a cleanse – that’s what you have a liver for.  This is a program to help you rid yourself of all the garbage that is unnecessary in our current diets and destroy the sugar dragon.

If you’re interested in the program, definitely check out the website or the book.  And if you have any questions about my experiences with it, please send me a note.

~FB

 

 

The Truth About Carbs

Good-Carbs-vs-Bad-Carb

The last decade has promoted carbs (carbohydrates) as an evil in diets and healthy eating.  But most people are misinformed and tout the bad about carbs and staving off them.  The truth of the matter is we need carbs.  We simply need to distinguish between good and bad carbs.   Good Carbs are full of fiber. These carbs that get absorbed slowly into our systems, avoiding spikes in blood sugar levels. Examples: whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and beans.  Fiber slows down the absorption of other nutrients eaten at the same meal, including carbohydrates.

  • This slowing down may help prevent peaks and valleys in your blood sugar levels, reducing your risk for type 2 diabetes.
  • Certain types of fiber found in oats, beans, and some fruits can also help lower blood cholesterol.
  • As an added plus, fiber helps people feel full, adding to satiety.

To get more fibre we need to (a) eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Five servings a day of fruits and vegetables will get you to about 10 or more grams of fiber, depending on your choices; (b) include some beans and bean products in your diet. A half-cup of cooked beans will add from 4 to 8 grams of fiber to your day; (c) switch to whole grains every single possible way (buns, rolls, bread, tortillas, pasta, crackers, etc.).   To minimize the health risk of bad carbs we need to eat fewer refined and processed carbohydrates that strip away beneficial fiber. Examples: white bread and white rice.  The problem is that the typical North American diet is anything but high in fiber.  “White” grain has become our way of life (because it’s easy and less expensive): we eat a muffin or bagel made with white flour in the morning, have our hamburger on a white bun, and then have white rice with our dinner.  In general, the more refined, or “whiter,” the grain-based food, the lower the fiber.

  • To nix the bad carbs we need to avoid: Sugars; “added” sugars {sugars, syrups and sweeteners that are added to foods at the table or during processing or preparation – such as high fructose corn syrup in sweetened beverages and baked products – that supply calories but few or no nutrients}; refined “white” grains.  We are eating more sugar than ever before. In fact, the average adult takes in about 20 teaspoons of added sugar every day.  That’s about 320 calories, which can quickly add up to extra pounds. Many adults simply don’t realize how much added sugar is in their diets.  Sugars and refined grains and starches supply quick energy to the body in the form of glucose. That’s a good thing if your body needs quick energy, for example if you’re running a race or competing in sports.

The better carbs for most people are unprocessed or minimally processed whole foods that contain natural sugars, like fructose in fruit or lactose in milk.  (Be cautious of snacks that tote low cal or low fat, like rice cakes – they also have very little fiber and very little protein.  Without protein, fat or fiber, these carbs are easily digested and  converted to blood glucose very quickly.)

CARBS

So, the truth of the matter, as most experts agree, is that for good health you need a healthy, balanced diet that includes carbs—at least a third of daily calories should come from carbohydrates.  To distinguish between good and bad carbs keep these tips in mind:

  • Skip refined and processed foods altogether
  • Read the label to see if there is added sugar. Be wary of the “-oses” like high fructose corn syrup
  • Choose whole grains (oats, some cereals, rye, millet, quinoa, whole grain and brown rice), beans, legumes, fruits and vegetables
  • Try to have 40% of your total caloric intake come from complex carbohydrates
  • Avoid the lure of low-fat foods, which contain a sizable amount of calories from sugar
  • Avoid the lure of low-carb foods, which sometimes have more calories from fat

The best carbs come from plants:

  • Fresh fruit, ideally those with a low glycemic Index like apricots, raspberries, strawberries and blackberries
  • Non-starchy vegetables
  • Whole grains and foods made from whole grains, such as certain types of bread and cereal
  • Nuts
  • Legumes

As well as dairy products that are not sweetened with sugar, such as yogurt, sour cream, cheese and milk.

The worst offenders:

  • Refined grains like white bread, white rice and enriched pasta (or anything enriched)
  • Processed foods such as cake, candy cookies and chips
  • White potatoes
  • Sweetened soft drinks
  • Sugar

Carbs Chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make good choices. 🙂

~Fit Bitch