Vitamin E and Your Diet (Guest Post)

The Importance of Vitamin E and how to Incorporate it into Your Diet

Daily vitamins and minerals are one of the most important parts of a healthy diet. We all know how important Vitamin C and B12 are—we hear about them all the time. The market is inundated with B12 vitamins. Vitamin D supplements sell well in the winter because we worry we’re not getting enough sun. What about the other, less popular vitamins? Vitamin E is an equally important part of the diet. Today, we’ll talk about why and how you can work it into your daily meal plan.

Vitamins help the body grow and develop. Each one does this in a unique way. For example, Vitamin E is organically built to protect the body from neurological and mental diseases, diabetes, and ailments of the eyes. There are two main types of vitamins: fat-soluble and water-soluble. Vitamin E is a fat-soluble vitamin which means that it is more resilient and the effects can last longer in the body. Water-soluble vitamins like B12 are flushed out of our system whenever excess water is. Comparatively, a person would need more B12 than Vitamin E since Vitamin E stays reserved in fat tissue. Taking too many fat-soluble vitamins can be dangerous for the body. Toxicity is often times more dangerous than a deficiency.
A deficiency of Vitamin E can lead to the destruction of red blood cells, which, if severe enough, can cause anemia. The symptoms of anemia include malaise, fatigue, and abnormal heart-rate. Not enough Vitamin E can lead to more serious complications like Retinopathy, which can render patients partially or completely blind. Since Vitamin E is responsible for protecting the body from eye disorders like this, it is important to make sure that you get your daily amount each day. Skeletal Myopathy can also result from a deficiency. This condition is categorized by weakness in the muscles and skeleton.
Vitamin E can be found in oils. Krill oil is virtually tasteless and it is a bounty of vitamins and minerals. While it is most known for containing Omega 3, a daily serving of krill oil can also get you a portion of your other essentials including Vitamin E. Vitamin E is vegetarian and vegan friendly. It can also be found in a variety of plant-sources. Since the vitamin is fat-soluble, you can cook any of these ingredients without worrying about losing some of the nutrients to the heat. Avocados, leafy greens, fruits, nuts, and wheat all contain Vitamin E. You can also pick up a supplement at the pharmacy to give you a boost!
The benefits of Vitamin E are absolutely free so make sure you’re taking the most advantage of them each and every day. All vitamins are important to understand and consider. By building a vitamin-rich diet, you can be a healthier and stronger person.
Writer’s Bio
Meet Jane Grates.

jane-grates

Jane:  new best friend material.  🙂

Jane is an award-winning web lover and the co-manager of RunnerclickMonica’s Health Mag, and Janes Kitchen Miracles (<– Go check out that site!  So cool!).
Jane is a travel scholar, writer, health enthusiast, and food and health practitioner.

Healthy (Compliant) Cookies

I have a little more left to go on my current Whole 30 and I have to say, this one has been easy.  Eating healthy, whole foods and eliminating sugar and processed food from my diet is like breathing these days.  I have not had any cravings this round (although, I am very much looking forward to some sushi in a few weeks).

Last night, however, I decided to make some cookies.  These cookies were amazeballs!  They are 100% healthy and 100% Whole 30 compliant so they’re even better.

And – they’re super simple to make.

  • 1 and a half mashed banana
  • 1 tablespoon of raw cocoa
  • 1 handful of unsweetened coconut (shredded)
  • 1 tablespoon of hemp seeds (optional)
  • 1-2 tablespoons of raisins* (optional)

After the banana is mashed, mix in the rest of the ingredients.  Then spoon onto a greased or lined baking sheet (I dabbed some coconut oil on mine) and bake at 350 for 10-12 minutes.

Cookie 1

Last night I made my them with raisins.  They were good but I don’t know if I’d add the raisins again – they made the cookies a little too sweet for me.  The next batch I’m going to eliminate the raisins or substitute them for raw cocoa nibs.  Or even try mixing some sunflower seed butter into the batter.  There are so many options for these yummy little treats.

Try them, and make them your own.

#yum

~Fit Bitch